Sunday, June 7, 2015

Conclusions from the Wannado (Math) Curriculum (a recently published book written by Ihor Charischak)

It’s entirely possible to fall in love with mathematics if the context is
right, like the “perfect storm,” where all the elements come together.
Beyond the day-to-day usefulness of math, mathematics can be
dynamic, fascinating, and empowering. Intrinsic motivation should
drive learning. The math curriculum should be open-ended and
allow for student and teacher creative flairs. There is a place for
teachers and students to be partners in their learning enterprise, so
that creating stories can bring a new life to what students would otherwise say is boring.

Weaving other subjects into the teaching of math is an incredibly powerful way to engage student imagination and help them to see math’s relevance to the real world. It’s fine to be able to solve an algebraic equation, but if students have no idea what it’s used for […], then what’s the point? Without a context, it’s just “mental gymnastics.” You don’t have to go far to see the math in history, science, music, and art. The list is endless.

Currently, story-based learning adventures are not part of most math curriculums. The focus remains on the “haftado” curriculum (e.g., passing through all the gates on the royal road to calculus, where rewards are mostly extrinsic). However, one can invent—or better yet, reinvent—mathematics. The shift from a “haftado” to a “wannado” curriculum does not need to deprive students of the basic skills they need to be successful. Rather, it provides the perfect context for understanding the relevancy of those skills and the motivation to learn them. If kids “wannado” the projects, they will learn whatever hard stuff they encounter in order to accomplish their project’s goals … just as they do when they play video games. We, as a math community, need to develop alternative routes for students with unique needs and skills. Technology opens the door for a whole host of alternatives. To keep the focus on math, it is imperative that technology be integral to the curriculum, rather than integrated. This is a subtle but important distinction because technology-based microworlds empower students to focus on getting to know powerful mathematical ideas seamlessly. I firmly believe that technology can transform teaching and learning environments and help students achieve beyond what is possible without it.

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