Saturday, June 13, 2015

The Motivation Equation

The heart and soul of student learning is intrinsic motivation. And no one does a better job of describing this phenomenon than Kathleen Cushman in her refreshingly short and web-based book "The Motivation Equation" which is available to read online or download for free.

The table of contents gives you a nice snapshot of what the book contains. Here are the chapter titles:

Preface. In which we meet Ned Cephalus, his teachers, and their learning scientist friends
Introducing the Motivation Equation. In which we consider what learners value and their expectations of success
Chapter 1. Make sure we’re okay. In which teachers make it safe to risk a try
Chapter 2. See that it matters. In which students discover a reason to care
Chapter 3. Keep it active! In which fun, play, and surprise create a culture of curiosity
Chapter 4. Get us to stretch. In which students see in different ways and reach beyond their grasp
Chapter 5. Act like a coach. In which teachers guide practice and reinforce new skills
Chapter 6. Ask us to use it. In which students explain, teach, present, and perform what they learn
Chapter 7. Give us time to reflect. In which students think back on their learning and growth
Chapter 8. Have us make plans. In which students figure out where to go next
Appendix 1. Teachers and their lessons. In which teachers use a protocol to study learner motivation
Appendix 2. Resources. In which we offer practical resources for teachers

If you only have time for one chapter read Introducing the Motivation Equation (linked above) to experience what this is all about.

Though I loved the book, it is not easy for a teacher to implement given the constraints of a typical classroom. But its definitely a worthwhile goal on the road to the Wannado curriculum*.

*In my book, I define “wannado” as an excited form of “want to do.” For example, I wanted to do my math homework, fearing the consequences of not doing it, whereas I always would wannado (play) baseball in whatever form it appeared. The same for having to do something. “Haftado” is an extreme, distasteful form of “have to do.”

“Instead of making kids learn math, let’s make math kids will learn.”

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